Friday May 17, Saturday May 18, Sunday May 19

Today will be cloudy with scattered showers and thunderstorms possible after 2pm. High near 68; low around 59. Saturday will be partly sunny, with a high near 76 and a low around 65. Sunday will be mostly sunny with a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms before 9am. High near 78 and a low around 65.

We have published a special “thank you” to the community, volunteers and donors from Northern High School After Prom Committee.

The DNR has released the 2019 planned hydrilla treatment schedule for Deep Creek Lake. In case you need to know, Hydrilla is a fast-growing aquatic invasive plant that scientists first found in the lake in 2013 and have been treating with a herbicide each year since 2014.  The herbicide treatment takes place each summer — for an overview of 2019 treatment locations and plans, including other information related to the treatment process, please visit https://go.usa.gov/xX5sM. The first treatment is scheduled for June 3.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources reminds drivers that it’s common to find eastern box turtles, snapping turtles, painted turtles and red-eared sliders on the road this time of year. If you need to help a turtle cross the road, check for traffic and move the turtle in the direction it was traveling, until it is safely out of vehicle lanes. Do not move the turtle to the side it started from or far away from where it is found. Read more.

Today is the last day to enter the drawing for two Celtic Festival tickets! Scroll down to Thursday’s notes see the details of the contest!

A reminder that Garrett County Public Utilities may be flushing fire hydrants in McHenry today.

Lastly, we have A LOT of events and entertainment going on this weekend — check the calendar for the details on birding, End of the Line Bookstore, the rabies clinic, a fishing rodeo and more! Be sure to wave if you see Mike or I out and about this weekend!

Thank you from Northern High’s After Prom Committee

Northern High’s After Prom Committee would like to thank all the businesses and individuals that contributed to the success of this year’s after prom celebration.   Your donations helped our mission of providing a safe and fun environment for the students of Garrett County.  We appreciate your support.

Accident Volunteer Fire Dept.

Ace’s Run Restaurant

Ahern, Debra

Anchor Church / Passion Fellowship

Annie’s Kitchen

Archie’s BBQ

Arrowhead Market

Art Butler Auto Sales Inc.

Ashby, Chris & Derek

Bear Creek Church of the Brethren

Bear Creek Traders

Bernie’s Photography

BeYOUtiful Salon Grantsville

BFS / Bruceton Ag Service Grantsville

Brenda’s Pizzeria

Byco Enterprises Inc.

Blooming Rose United Methodist Church

Canoe on the Run Café

Caparella, Terry

Casselman Bakery & Cafe

Catholic Daughters of America #2209

Chestnut Ridge Gas

Chick-Fil-A LaVale

Chillin’ Hot Grill & Deli

Cobblestone Hair Salon

Christ Lutheran Church-Grantsville

Circle R Ranch

Dairy Queen Oakland

DCL Adventures

Deep Creek Fitness

Deep Creek Pottery

Deep Creek Lake Pizza

Deep Creek Mountain Land Company, NLP

Deep Creek Property Owners Association

Deep Creek Times

Derato, Sandy & Mike

Deep Creek Spray Tan

Demaree Inflatable Boats Inc.

Diehl’s Ford Sales, Inc.

Double G RV Park

The Draft Sports Bar & Grille

Dream Dental

Dutch’s at Silver Tree

Eastern Garrett County Vol. Fire & Rescue

El Canelo Mexican Restaurant

Emmanuel Lutheran Church

Emmanuel United Methodist Women

Fike, Conner, & Associates CPS

First People’s Com. Federal Credit Union

First United Bank

Friends Stockyard

Friendsville Pharmacy

Funland

Gale, Maney

Garrett 8 Cinemas

Garrett College & CARC staff

Garrett Community Aquatic & Recreation Center (CARC)

Garrett County Commissioners

Garrett County Education Association

Garrett County Fair Board

Garrett County Memorial VFW 01177

Garrett County Republican Women

Garrett County Sheriff’s Dept.

Glazed and Confuse Don

Goehringer’s Catering

Goldblum, Donald Scott Attorney

Good to Go, Friendsville

Gosnell Inc.

GoPT

Grantsville American Legion Post 214

Grantsville Fire Dept.

Grantsville Lions Club

Grantsville Rotary

Greene Turtle

G&W Lumber Inc.

Hair Raisers

Hardesty’s True Value

Hartman’s Liberty Gas Station

Harvey, Keri & Brian

Heiligs Plumbing Heating & Electrical LLC

Hen House Restaurant

Hey Pizza

High Mountain Sports

Humberson Homes, LLC

Humberson, Melvin & Carolyn

IHOP Restaurant

LuLaRoe / Thirty-One, Jill Mason

Jr Women’s Civic Club

Joint Training Facility (JTF)

Judge Ray Strubin

Keep Collective, Jessica Cooper

Keystone Lime Co Inc.

Lakeside Creamery

Lakeview Auto Parts / CarQuest Auto Parts

Ledo’s McHenry

Lowe’s Oakland

Massage at the Lake Day Spa

Master Craft Boat Sales

Mayor & Town Council of Accident

Mayor & Town Council of Friendsville

McDonald’s at Keyser’s Ridge

McHenry United Methodist Church

Moran, Tom

Mt. Zion United Methodist Church & Youth Group

Nola Salon LLC

NHS Athletics

NHS Athletic Boosters

NHS Office

Oak Grove Church of the Brethren

Oakland Elks Lodge #2481

Peck, Shaun

Perez, Pebbles

Penn Alps Restaurant and Craft Shop

Phenix Technologies Inc.

Pilot Gas of Grantsville

Pioneer Conveyor, Inc.

Planners Consulting Group, Inc.

Print Shoppe Grantsville

Powell Auto Parts

Powell, Billy & Susan

Railey Realty, Inc.

Rhoten, Shana

The Rolling Pin

Rollman, Misty & Brian

Rush Services

Sacred Ground

Samantha Funding the Arts

Schmidt, Klaus

Shop N Save Fresh- Deep Creek

Sheetz Oakland

Sisler Lumber

Slopeside Gas Station and Market LLC

Spiker Brothers Inc.

St. Ann’s Catholic Church/Divine Mercy Parish

Taste & See Bakery, Virgil Long

Taylor-Made

Thirst for Art, Jenny Wampler

Thomas Tax Services, Nancy Thomas

Total Biz Fulfillment Inc.

Tourist Trap / Christmas Chalet

Trader’s Coffee House

Trinity United Church of Christ

Umbel, Mary Ann

Uno’s of Deep Creek

WalMart Oakland

Wepco Federal Credit Union

William Yant DDA, PA

Wisp Resort

Working H Meats

Yoder-Hershberger Insurance

Thursday May 16

The weather today will be mostly sunny, with a high near 66 and a low around 55. A chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2am tonight.  

 


WIN WIN WIN! Win 2 tickets to the upcoming Garrett County Celtic Fest by emailing us the name of the “monster” in this photo — the kids will lean the story at the festival. You have until tomorrow at 4pm to email us your guess at info@deepcreektimes.com or use this form:

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

There’s a Dough Rai$er to benefit Garrett Mentors today — visit this link and print their flyer and tell em Deep Creek Times sent ya! Garrett Mentors provides the Pre-kindergarten through grade five children in the Garrett County Public Schools with caring, committed, adult mentors.

Maryland Humanities is pleased to announce that a Garrett County student won an award at Maryland History Day! Leah Mackenzie won the Dr. Dean Mesologites Awards for Medicine and Society for her exhibit on penicillin.

Also, Maryland Humanities is seeking both experienced discussion facilitators as well as those interested in learning the skill of leading engaging conversations for several of their programs. A free, two-day workshop will be offered on June 11 – 12 in Annapolis. Deadline to apply: May 31, 2019. If you have questions about the training, contact program officer Andrea Lewis alewis@mdhumanities.org. You will find more information and the application here.

Maryland’s regular striped bass season gets underway today!

Let Michelle Ross of the Town of Oakland know if you can help with the renowned Little Yough Summer Music Festival. She is looking for sponsorships and volunteers. Contact her at mainstreetgoba@gmail.com or 301-334-2691.

Wednesday May 15

The weather for today is clearing off from what seemed like years of rain (thank goodness!) … today will be increasing clouds, with a high near 61 and a low around 47. Chance of showers mainly between midnight and 4am.

I took this photo looking up from my deck this morning!

Looking up into blue sky and green tree leaves this morning in Deep Creek Lake, MD

Tomorrow, May 17, is National Bike to Work Day! Plan to ride your bike into work or just get out and cruise around the block. Biking is one of my favorite hobbies!

Cornerstone Family Medicine has announced they will be providing OB services at the Grantsville Medical Center. Read more on this announcement here.

Subway at the Lake has been renovated and is now open (under new ownership).

Are you interested in volunteering at the Discovery Center and/or Deep Creek Lake State Park? Or, just want to find out more about the volunteer group and what they do for the park? Plan to attend the quarterly meeting TONIGHT at 6:30 pm in the science room at the Discovery Center to learn more. No RSVP necessary.

Last minute tickets are still available for the next business casual networking social for the Deep Creek community – the Glade Garden Party! The 2019 “Social for the Locals” party generously hosted by North Glade Inn is on Tuesday, May 21!  Enjoy the homemade food, dance to the DJ, sing along to the band entertainment and swap stories with new friends over cocktails. We are Deep Creek and we can’t wait to meet you!

The Maryland State Police have announced that there will be a sobriety checkpoint at some point during the week of May 19, 2019 and May 25, 2019 in an attempt to reduce the number of drugged and drunken drivers on Garrett County Roadways.

The Appalachian Regional Commission announced the creation of a Substance Abuse Advisory Council (SAAC). This group will develop recommendations for building a recovery ecosystem throughout Appalachia. This will be important work in reversing the opioid epidemic — I am blown away by the statistic that the 2017 death rate for opioid overdoses in Appalachian counties was 72 percent higher than non-Appalachian counties.

The Garrett County Celtic Festival contest is still open! Check out the Celtic Fest schedule at http://gccelticfestival.com/kid and email us the name of the monster kids will learn about at 11:00am. Winner will be randomly drawn from all correct entries received by Friday May 17th at 4:00pm EST.

ARC Creates Substance Abuse Advisory Council

Today, the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) announced the formation of the Substance Abuse Advisory Council (SAAC), a 24 member volunteer advisory group of leaders from law enforcement, recovery services, health, economic development, private industry, education, state government and other sectors. The SAAC will develop recommendations for ARC to consider as part of a strategic plan to build and strengthen a recovery ecosystems in Appalachian communities by drawing on their own experiences, as well as community insight gathered during ARC’s six recent Regional Recovery-to-Work Listening Sessions.

According to Opioids in Appalachia: The Role of Counties in Reversing a Regional Epidemic, a new report by the National Association of Counties (NaCO) and ARC, the 2017 death rate for opioid overdoses in Appalachian counties was an astounding 72 percent higher than non-Appalachian counties.“

In addition to the tragic toll of lives lost, substance abuse is increasingly becoming an economic and workforce issue in our Region”, said ARC Federal Co-Chair Tim Thomas. “I appreciate the willingness of these knowledgeable and experienced leaders from throughout the Region who have come together to help ARC develop strategies to support Appalachia communities. By focusing on the recovery ecosystem, which supports those in long-term recovery as they move back to the workforce, the Substance Abuse Advisory Council will be addressing an important piece of the overarching effort to combat substance use disorder in our Region.”

Members of ARC’s Substance Abuse Advisory Council were selected in partnership with the Governor’s office in each of their respective states, and include:

William M. Babington, Division Chief Law Enforcement and Traffic Safety Division, Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs  (ADECA), Montgomery, AL;

Sarah Newman Boateng, Executive Deputy Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Health, Harrisburg, PA;

Jenell Brewer, Founder/CEO, SPARK (Special People Advocating Recovery Kentucky), Stanton, KY;

Craig Clark, PE, PhD, Chairman of the Board, Community Colleges of Appalachia; Vice President of Economic Development, Alfred State, Alfred, NY;

Olivia Collier, ARC Program Manager, North Carolina Department of Commerce, Raleigh, NC;

Melanie Dallas, LPC, Chief Executive Officer, Highland Rivers Health, Dalton, GA;

Nick Erwin, Director of Human Resources, Bellisio Foods, Jackson, OH;

Mark Farley, Development District of Appalachia Association; Executive Director, Upper Cumberland Development District, Cookeville, TN;

Sara Goldsby, MSW, MPH, Director, South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services, Columbia, SC;

Nancy Hale, President/CEO, Operation UNITE, London, KY;

Robert H. Hansen, Director of the Office of Drug Control Policy, West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, Charleston, WV;

Karen Kelley, Chief Program Officer, TROSA, Durham, NC;

Kody H. Kinsley, Deputy Secretary for Behavioral Health & Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, NC;

Patricia Lincourt, LCSW, Associate Commissioner, New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, Albany, NY;

Devin A. Lyall, Founder/Director, Wilkes Recovery Revolution, Inc., North Wilkesboro, NC;

S. Hughes Melton, MD, MBA, Commissioner, Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, Richmond, VA;

Duane Miller, Executive Director, LENOWISCO Planning District Commission, Duffield, VA;

Robert Pack, PhD, MPH,  Professor, Community and Behavioral Health, Eastern Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN;

Brittany Pittman, ARC Program Manager, Georgia Department of Community Affairs, Atlanta, GA;

Tammy Reynolds, Captain, Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics, Tupelo, MS;

Stephanie Muncy Surrett, Executive Director, Southwest Virginia Alliance for Manufacturing Inc. Center of Excellence, Abingdon, VA;

Sean Terrell, Dean, Workforce Development, Hocking College, Nelsonville, OH;

Chief Robert Ware, Portsmouth Police Department, Portsmouth, OH;

Courtney Thomas-Winterberg, Director, Allegany County Department of Social Services, Cumberland, MD.

The SAAC will hold its first working meeting May 15-16, 2019 in Knoxville, Tennessee. Additional information about the Substance Abuse Advisory Council, as well as ARC’s current portfolio of work on this issue, is available at www.arc.gov/substanceabuse.

Cornerstone Family Medicine providing OB services at Grantsville Medical Center

Expanding their obstetrics services to northern Garrett County and the surrounding region, Sotiere Savopoulos, M.D. and Becky Crowell, D.O., of Cornerstone Family Medicine, are seeing prenatal and post-partum patients at Grantsville Medical Center.  Operated by Garrett Regional Medical Center, the Grantsville Medical Center offers a growing array of services that include primary, urgent and specialty care.

“We’re working to ensure that expectant mothers in our area get the prenatal care they and their babies need,” said Sotiere Savopoulos, M.D.  “We take our patients through prenatal visits right through the delivery of their baby. By providing our services at the Grantsville site, we’re hoping to make prenatal visits more convenient for people living in northern Garrett County and nearby areas of Pennsylvania.”

Cornerstone Family Medicine has offices in Oakland, providing family care and obstetrics. Over the course of his career, Dr. Savopoulos has delivered more than 2,000 babies at Garrett Regional Medical Center and has dedicated his career to practicing in the region.  He is Board Certified in Family Medicine and received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College.

Dr. Becky Crowell has been practicing in western Maryland for nearly a decade.  She received her undergraduate degree at University of Maryland College Park and her Doctor of Osteopathy at A.T. Still University College of Osteopathic Medicine.

“As family medicine doctors, we work with each mom-to-be throughout their pregnancy and dedicate ourselves to providing a highly personalized and intimate birthing experience at Garrett Regional Medical Center, where we are credentialed” said Becky Crowell, D.O.  “Backed by a highly experienced staff and modern, spacious maternity suites, we are dedicated to providing our families with the best delivery experience possible.”

Prior to their delivery date, Dr. Savopoulos and Dr. Crowell encourage their OB patients to tour GRMC’s maternity center and meet the OB staff.  The Family Centered Maternity Care Unit at GRMC is designed to provide a safe, comfortable atmosphere to welcome expectant parents and their newborns.  It features five LDRP (Labor, Delivery, Recovery and Postpartum) rooms and four private patient rooms.   The spacious, suite-style patient rooms are designed with efficiency and patient comfort in mind. A fully equipped, functional nursery is also available for infants with special needs.

To schedule an obstetrics appointment at Grantsville Medical Center, patients may call Cornerstone Family Medicine at 301-533-1046.  Visible from I-68, the Grantsville Medical Center is located at 32 Corporate Drive in the Northern Garrett Industrial Park, neighboring Total Biz Fulfillment and the World Lighthouse Worship Center.  Grantsville Medical Center was established in February 2017 to provide primary, urgent, and specialty care services for residents of the greater Grantsville area and neighboring communities in Pennsylvania.

Tuesday May 14

The weather for today will be mostly cloudy with scattered showers mainly before 4pm. Gradually becoming mostly clear overnight; a high near 47 with a low around 40.

A reminder that anyone affected by the Luke Mill closing can go to workforceallegany.com to register for assistance.  A recruitment fair will be held today at the Bruce Outreach Center from 11-7pm.

There is also a meeting for loggers affected by the Luke Mill closure: Today’s Mountain Loggers meeting will be at the Garrett County Fairgrounds Ag Heritage Building at 6pm and state legislators, county commissioners, and county economic development staff will be in attendance to discuss the impact of the Verso Mill closing. They ask that anyone planning to attend RSVP to Andrew Sisler at 304-288-1927.

The Garrett County Health Department will be holding rabies clinics this week and various locations throughout the county — tonight the event will be held at the Gorman Fire Dept. from 5-6pm.

Fisherman (dad and son) and Goslings along the Lake

The Maryland Amphibian and Reptile Atlas is now available from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. This atlas is a result of over 1,000 community scientist volunteers and biologists working together to document distributions of reptiles and amphibians across the state.

Win 2 tickets to the Garrett County Celtic Festival, in Friendsville, MD on June 1st. Take the whole family to celebrate the cultural heritage of Celtic peoples from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Brittany and their influence on Appalachia with a daylong festival by the bonnie banks of the Youghiogheny River in the Town Park in Friendsville, Maryland.  The Celtic Festival is a family friendly event featuring traditional and contemporary Celtic music, Irish and Scottish dancing, Highland athletes, Pipe & Drum bands, Clans, living history and educational presentations, Celtic Marketplace, Bairns (Children’s) activities area, and many activities planned throughout the day.
TO WIN: Check out the Celtic Fest schedule at http://gccelticfestival.com/kid and email us the name of the monster kids will learn about at 11:00am. Winner will be randomly drawn from all correct entries received by Friday May 17th at 4:00pm EST.

From the Maryland MVA — Some Maryland driver’s licenses & ID cards may be recalled if they are not in compliance w/ federally-mandated Real ID requirements. Need to check if you’re affected? Use our #REALID lookup tool: https://bit.ly/2zViPzN and learn more here.

FEDERAL REAL ID IMPLEMENTATION WILL PROMPT RECALL OF THOUSANDS OF MARYLAND DRIVER’S LICENSES AND ID CARDS BEGINNING IN JUNE

Documents needed for compliance; 66,300 Marylanders Have Not Yet Responded to Notices from MDOT MVA

A group of Marylanders are at risk of having their driver’s licenses or identification cards recalled in June if they don’t satisfy document requirements that are part of the federally-mandated REAL ID process.

Some Marylanders who have the new REAL ID license or identification card still must bring in certain documentation to comply with the federal REAL ID requirement.

The overall deadline for obtaining a REAL ID is October 1, 2020, but more than 66,300 Marylanders with a new REAL ID star license or identification card have not yet filed the required documents. These people have been contacted by the Maryland Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Administration (MDOT MVA) multiple times since December and need to bring those documents to the MDOT MVA by June to complete the process. Without those documents, MDOT MVA will start flagging the affected driver’s licenses and identification cards in June as “recalled.”

The recall of a driver’s license will make the physical card invalid. Customers would still be licensed drivers, but if pulled over by law enforcement, they would have their driver’s licenses confiscated. To avoid this, customers who are part of this group MUST come to a MDOT MVA branch with the required documents as soon as possible and are urged to make an appointment. Affected customers have received three notices via email since December that warn of the June 2019 deadline. They will receive three additional notices in the coming weeks via email and the U.S. Postal Service.

“It’s very important that MDOT MVA customers who have received REAL ID notifications pay attention to the deadlines and provide documents to their nearest branch as soon as possible,” said MDOT MVA Administrator Chrissy Nizer.

REAL ID was passed by Congress after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and creates standards for secure driver’s licenses and identification cards nationwide. As of October 1, 2020, all Marylanders must have documents on file and be REAL ID compliant to use a state-issued driver’s license or identification card to board an airplane or enter federal government facilities.

Maryland began issuing REAL ID licenses and identification cards in 2009 under a process that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) deemed compliant. However, in October 2017, DHS informed Maryland that all customers with a driver’s license or identification card containing the REAL ID star must have documents on file with MDOT MVA.

As a result, some people have the newly-designed driver’s license or identification card, but still need to bring in documents to become REAL ID compliant. The documents can include: a birth certificate or passport, proof of social security and two documents proving a Maryland home address. For those in this group, including those facing the June deadline, there’s no charge for this process since these customers already paid to get their new license.

Administrator Nizer said that for those unsure whether they are part of the group facing the June recall, “we have developed tools to make checking your REAL ID status as simple as possible.”

People can go to the MVA’s REAL ID Look Up Tool, at www.mva.maryland.gov/realidlookup. When customers enter their driver’s license or identification card number, the tool provides details on their REAL ID status. For those facing the June deadline, the Look Up Tool will indicate:

“You are required to present documents in order to meet federal REAL ID Act requirements. Please bring your documents to a MDOT MVA branch office by MM/DD/YYYY. Failure to respond may result in action against your Maryland Driver’s License or ID card.”

The message asks customers to collect the required documents and make an appointment. Appointments aren’t required, but those who make one are guaranteed to be seen within 15 minutes of the scheduled time. Appointments can be made at www.mva.maryland.gov/realid.

The MVA has added more than 1,900 weekly appointment slots across the state, and now has more than 3,000 appointments available every day. Branch offices in Baltimore City, Essex, Easton, Frederick, Gaithersburg and Westminster have extended hours, from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, continuing through July 2 to assist in handling high volumes of REAL ID transactions. The Loveville branch in St. Mary’s County is offering Saturday hours of 8 a.m. to noon, also through July 2.

After the June deadline, there will still be nearly a million customers in the same situation – they received the new REAL ID license or identification card but need to file documents with the MVA to satisfy federal requirements. Those affected are being notified over a period of time, to ensure staff could meet standards for outstanding service for these customers, other REAL ID applicants and those conducting other business with the MVA. In May, the MVA will start another six-month notification process for people who will face a November 2019 deadline, then other notifications will go out monthly for those facing later deadlines. The timing allows all of these customers six months in order to comply.

There are 5 million Marylanders with a driver’s license or identification card. Of these, 2.3 million to date have the required federal REAL ID documents on file with MDOT MVA.

Monday May 13

Sunday was rainy and everything is really green around the lake. Today will be showers with a high near 50 and a low around 38.New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible.

The Orioles are here at the lake.  No, not the baseball team, the birds.  Been putting out grape jelly and oranges and we had our first pair at our house on Saturday. They flew the coop (yes, that was witty) too fast for me to get a picture, but they are a sure sign summer is on the way!

Speaking of summer, the Deep Creek Lake Lions Club held their annual boat auction Saturday afternoon.  Good turnout and lots of boats sold, with some really good buys I think.  Here’s a photo of auctioneer Dana and club president Chris in action. Nice job folks!

Lions Boat Auction

The Garrett County Health Department joins the country in celebrating National Prevention Week this week. This observance is dedicated to increasing the prevention of substance abuse and the promotion of mental health and brings together individuals, organizations, coalitions, states, and communities to celebrate the events and activities held throughout the year to raise awareness about the importance of preventing substance abuse and mental disorders.

The Friends of Deep Creek Lake just issued their May newsletter and it includes some interesting history, thoughts, funding insight/opinion and even a call-to-action for all their constituents.  You can read it by clicking this link.

The Board of County Commissioners will conduct a Public Work Session today starting 5:30 pm on the Preliminary Garrett County Government Fiscal Year 2020 Operating and Capital Budget. This meeting will be held at the Garrett County Courthouse in the Board of Garrett County Commissioners Public Meeting Room.  The public is invited to attend.

Get involved with Garrett Lakes Arts Festival (GLAF)!  They are holding an information session for potential volunteers this evening from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm at the home of Betty and Troy Ellington. I (Mike) have had the pleasure of serving on their board in the past and Mary, Andrew, Betty and the team do some great work bringing performing arts to our county, but they can’t do it alone. Stop by and chat, have a glass of wine and maybe you can help continue their great work.

We have two free tickets to give away to the Garrett County Celtic Festival. The festival will be held in Friendsville on June 1st and is a family-friendly event featuring traditional and contemporary Celtic music, Irish and Scottish dancing, Highland athletes, Pipe & Drum bands, Clans, living history and educational presentations, Celtic Marketplace and many other activities. Check out the schedule of kid friendly events and then send us an email at info@deepcreektimes.com and tell us the name of the monster children will learn about at 11:30 am.  We’ll draw a winner from the correct answers and let you know if you are the lucky one!

A note from the County United Way Executive Director

On the heels of the local United Way campaign completion, it was announced that Luke Mill would close its operations leaving 675 individuals without jobs. Over the course of the next few days it was reported that for every single job lost, there would be an additional three also affected. These numbers are crippling. Will these labor-skilled employees find new work in our community? Some will. What about those who don’t?

I have been with County United Way for over four years and have watched the annual campaign in each county slowly decline. Just this year our Allegany County campaign lost over $20,000. The closing of the Luke Mill brought a loss of over $11,000 in Allegany County and over $12,000 in Mineral County. You see, the employees graciously gave a small portion of each paycheck to the campaign. It wasn’t an amount that would be missed from day to day, but the one or two dollars per pay that they collectively gave made a big difference in the communities we serve…in the communities where we all live.

I don’t believe it’s a far stretch to assume very few understand United Way. Of course, we provide information when we make presentations at local businesses and we, a staff of three and a half, do what we can on social media. We’ve been working tirelessly to do a better job of talking about what we do. But as the old saying goes – you can lead a horse to water… County United Way – the local chapter which operates out of Cumberland, MD and serves Allegany, Garrett, Hampshire and Mineral Counties individually (a different setup than most chapters) – is over 60 years old. It has served these communities for decades. We are fortunate to have a handful of volunteers who have been with us for most of those decades. Those volunteers, along with many others, have gone on a journey with us over the past 18 months as we have worked to transform ourselves into a more modern, responsive organization. This is not your grandfather’s United Way.

United Way has always adapted to change. In a climate where more and more working families are struggling to keep their heads above water, United Way is the organization in your community equipped to respond to those needs. The dollars we raise and grant to nonprofits have flexibility other dollars simply do not. What that means for someone in need is that when they seek help from United Way programs, there is no question of income. If someone in our community needs help, we help them. We will always provide dollars to assist low-income children and families – this is at the heart of what we do. Where we have made a transformation is asking our partner organizations to consider that “at-risk” and hard times has no income limits. Each and every day, many of us are facing that one life event which could put us at risk of losing everything we have. For every person, that one life event is something different and “everything lost” is defined in many different ways.

We have had to do more with fewer dollars. New generations no longer write a check and feel confident that their money will be used as they hope. Organizations must let donors follow their dollars from deposit to awarded grants to implementation and impact, which is not unreasonable. We cannot continue to ask our longtime donors to bear the weight of supporting our organization and it is necessary to seek new donors who will see the value and true impact we make.

Without United Way, these working families will be even more limited. Programs will decline to a point in which only small numbers of individuals can be served, leaving thousands with no resources. Who are these individuals? Your grandmother who has to choose between food and life-saving medications. Your niece or nephew who go to after-school and summer programs, giving them a safe place when otherwise they would be left alone during vulnerable times. Your coworker who struggles to keep the heat on for herself and children during our chilling winters. Someone who attends your church and uses our resources while she raises her grandchildren. Your father, brother, cousin, neighbor, friend.

This is not a plea for donations. Rather, this is an invitation to our community to learn what we do and why. We will continue to work hard to prove our worth and value and showcase the tremendous impact we have during events and outreach. County United Way does not rely on government grants or resources – it is only through local dollars from individuals, employees through payroll deduction and through businesses who see a value in what we do.

To the Luke employees who have supported us, thank you. Thank you for seeing the value in our work. We want you to know your dollars made a difference in our region for so many. More importantly, it is our hope that the programs you have helped support will be there to support you when the need arises.

For more information, visit cuw.org or dial 2-1-1 for program and service needs.

Juli McCoy

Executive Director, County United Way

Health Department Celebrates National Prevention Week

The Garrett County Health Department joins the country in celebrating National Prevention Week May 12-18, 2019. This observance is dedicated to increasing the prevention of substance use and the promotion of mental health. The celebration brings together individuals, organizations, coalitions, states, and communities to celebrate the events and activities held throughout the year to raise awareness about the importance of preventing substance use and mental disorders.

“The more people we can get involved in prevention, the more people we can reach with the prevention messages,” said Sandy Miller, Prevention Supervisor at the Garrett County Health Department. “We increase the reach of our prevention team by helping our volunteers expand the prevention effort.”

In addition, the health department is celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the creation of the Community Planning Groups, which started as grassroots organizations designed to provide alternative activities for youth in an effort to prevent tobacco, alcohol and other drug use.

The Community Planning Groups are led by Community Health Outreach Workers from the health department and are made up of volunteers with many different backgrounds. Currently, there are groups in Accident, Crellin, Friendsville, Kitzmiller, and Oakland, although through the years planning groups have affected 11 different communities throughout the county.

“The planning groups are at the heart of our prevention efforts,” Miller said. “Thousands of Garrett County families have encountered a moment when a team of volunteers at a planning group event have educated them about the negative effects of tobacco, alcohol, prescription drugs, and marijuana.”

Specific topics covered by this year’s National Prevention Week include the prevention of the following: prescription and opioid drug misuse; underage drinking and alcohol misuse; illicit drug use and youth marijuana use; youth tobacco use; and suicide.

“If you would like to get involved in the prevention effort in Garrett County, you are welcome to join one of these community groups,” said Miller. “We have Action Teams working on different topics, the Stand Together group tackling the Opioid issue, and community planning groups providing alternative activities and prevention messages in their communities.”

For more information about any of these groups, call the health department’s prevention team at 301-334-7730 or 301-895-3111. The National Prevention Week is sponsored by SAMHSA.

Friday May 10, Saturday May 11, Sunday May 12

The weather for today will be cloudy with showers likely. A high near 64 a low around 44. Saturday will be mostly cloudy with a chance of showers, mainly after 3pm. A high near 60 and a low around 47. Sunday has showers and thunderstorms possible after 2pm; a high near 56 and a low around 44.

Deep Creek Lake, MD Rural Farm Life

Why not go mining for some gold on Saturday?  Actually the 15th annual Blue and Gold Mine Sale is on in Morgantown Saturday morning.  All sorts of stuff and to find a new home for and it raises funds for the United Way – over $65,000 in the past five years.

A little closer to home is the Grantsville National Road and Town Wide Yard Sale.  There will be food and lots of individual yard sales all around.  Plus, there will be re-enactors from Braddock’s Road War.  I think General Braddock may have held the first yard sale in the area way back in the day.  Not sure, but lots to do and buy at this one.

There’s a Mad Hatter Tea Party at the Mountain Fresh Farmers Market Saturday from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm at the pavilion in Oakland.  This event will pair teas with numerous homemade baked goods and of course, there will be plenty of fresh produce and other goodies. There will also be photo ops with some interesting characters.

The Deep Creek lake Lions Club, of which I am a brand new member, is holding their annual boat auction on Saturday at 1:00 pm at the Lion’s Club Park on Bumble Bee road.  You can find more information and auction items here.  All proceeds go to support the Lions Blind camper and Blind skier programs.

The above just gives you a sampling of what is going on Saturday of this weekend. Check out our Upcoming Events and Entertainment Guide sections for more to do and see all weekend.

There are several rabies clinics scheduled around the area. Only $5 for each pet.

Garrett Regional Medical Center has been awarded as a model for their cancer navigation program. Way to go!

We have recently found out that US Cellular offers $1,000 grants for local community groups. Visit the link for more info.

We wish all moms everywhere a great weekend and a special day on Sunday. Don’t forget our area restaurants, many of which have special menus or buffets for Mothers Day.  And, Moms, don’t forget to stop by Lakeside Creamery or Huey’s Ice Cream for your free scoop or ice cream Sunday.

End of the Line Bookstore Opens for 2019 Season

The End of the Line Bookstore is open May 17 for the 2019 season.  End of the Line Books is a not for profit, used bookstore located in the boxcar at the B&O Railway Station East Liberty Street in Oakland, MD.  The bookstore is open May 17 through October 12th on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 11 AM – 3 PM.

Featuring a full range of novels including current and past current fiction, classics, science fiction, mysteries and romance, End of the Line Books features something for everyone.  Non-fiction books available include history, current events, economics, sports, nature, religion, psychology and self-help books as well as books on home repair, gardening, cooking and more. Children will love the great selection of chapter books, picture books, ones for beginning readers and books to help homeschooling families.

You’ll also find a nice selection of reference books and some large print books.  Depending on donations, the bookstore will occasionally feature audio books, CD’s, videos, DVD’s, puzzles and games.  No book costs more than $1.00 and many are less.

The bookstore was started as a way to solve the problem of too little space for book donations to be sold at the local library.  Originated by Marilyn Moors, then president of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and Elizabeth Huxford of the local Girl Scouts, along with former Oakland Mayor Asa McCain,  End of the Line Books has been recycling books and offering them for re-sale since 2004.

Proceeds from the bookstore go to two organizations.  The sales and monetary donations at End of the Line for the past 14 years have surpassed $56,000, and $46,979 has been donated to local organizations as a result.

Girl Scout Troop 55004 serves girls from Brownies through Seniors from six schools throughout Garrett County.   In an effort to serve the community, they have donated thousands of boxes of Girl Scout Cookies to local charities and soldiers overseas.  Through their accomplishments they have achieved the highest award a Girl Scout can receive, the Gold Award.  Donations from End of the Line books help fund their activities and service projects.

The Garrett branch of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) is the second recipient of funds from the bookstore.  Locally, AAUW provides over $3,000 in scholarships to area women each year which can be used to purchase textbooks, pay toward tuition and more   AAUW is also the sponsoring organization for Girls Empowerment Middle School (GEMS) Project.  “GEMS is now in its third full year.  It is a mentoring program for middle school girls, specifically 7th graders, which we all remember as being a difficult time in our lives,” stated Linda Carr, Vice-President of AAUW and Mentoring Chairperson.  The program pairs local women with middle school girls who may need a supportive woman role model in their lives.  “We’ve had a wonderful response from guidance counselors and teachers, and we’re getting a good response from the community in terms of volunteer mentors, and we hope to continue growing the program into the 2019 – 2020 school year,” said Carr.

AAUW Garrett Branch is also the sponsor for the newly formed Garrett College student branch of AAUW.  Donations from the bookstore have sent 8 students from Garrett College and Frostburg State University to The National Conference for College Women Student Leaders (NCCWSL), the nation’s premier conference for college women, held each spring in College Park, MD.

If you’re looking for a good book to lose yourself in this summer, stop by End of the Line Books soon.  Your purchase not only helps to recycle, every penny you spend goes to a good cause.  For more information, to volunteer or to donate used books (children’s books especially needed!), contact Linda Carr at lindacarr7125@gmail.com.

From the County United Way Executive Director

On the heels of the local United Way campaign completion, it was announced that Luke Mill would close its operations leaving 675 individuals without jobs. Over the course of the next few days it was reported that for every single job lost, there would be an additional three also affected. These numbers are crippling. Will these labor-skilled employees find new work in our community? Some will. What about those who don’t?

I have been with County United Way for over four years and have watched the annual campaign in each county slowly decline. Just this year our Allegany County campaign lost over $20,000. The closing of the Luke Mill brought a loss of over $11,000 in Allegany County and over $12,000 in Mineral County. You see, the employees graciously gave a small portion of each paycheck to the campaign. It wasn’t an amount that would be missed from day to day, but the one or two dollars per pay that they collectively gave made a big difference in the communities we serve…in the communities where we all live.

I don’t believe it’s a far stretch to assume very few understand United Way. Of course, we provide information when we make presentations at local businesses and we, a staff of three and a half, do what we can on social media. We’ve been working tirelessly to do a better job of talking about what we do. But as the old saying goes – you can lead a horse to water… County United Way – the local chapter which operates out of Cumberland, MD and serves Allegany, Garrett, Hampshire and Mineral Counties individually (a different setup than most chapters) – is over 60 years old. It has served these communities for decades. We are fortunate to have a handful of volunteers who have been with us for most of those decades. Those volunteers, along with many others, have gone on a journey with us over the past 18 months as we have worked to transform ourselves into a more modern, responsive organization. This is not your grandfather’s United Way.

United Way has always adapted to change. In a climate where more and more working families are struggling to keep their heads above water, United Way is the organization in your community equipped to respond to those needs. The dollars we raise and grant to nonprofits have flexibility other dollars simply do not. What that means for someone in need is that when they seek help from United Way programs, there is no question of income. If someone in our community needs help, we help them. We will always provide dollars to assist low-income children and families – this is at the heart of what we do. Where we have made a transformation is asking our partner organizations to consider that “at-risk” and hard times has no income limits. Each and every day, many of us are facing that one life event which could put us at risk of losing everything we have. For every person, that one life event is something different and “everything lost” is defined in many different ways.

We have had to do more with fewer dollars. New generations no longer write a check and feel confident that their money will be used as they hope. Organizations must let donors follow their dollars from deposit to awarded grants to implementation and impact, which is not unreasonable. We cannot continue to ask our longtime donors to bear the weight of supporting our organization and it is necessary to seek new donors who will see the value and true impact we make.

Without United Way, these working families will be even more limited. Programs will decline to a point in which only small numbers of individuals can be served, leaving thousands with no resources. Who are these individuals? Your grandmother who has to choose between food and life-saving medications. Your niece or nephew who go to after-school and summer programs, giving them a safe place when otherwise they would be left alone during vulnerable times. Your coworker who struggles to keep the heat on for herself and children during our chilling winters. Someone who attends your church and uses our resources while she raises her grandchildren. Your father, brother, cousin, neighbor, friend.

This is not a plea for donations. Rather, this is an invitation to our community to learn what we do and why. We will continue to work hard to prove our worth and value and showcase the tremendous impact we have during events and outreach. County United Way does not rely on government grants or resources – it is only through local dollars from individuals, employees through payroll deduction and through businesses who see a value in what we do.

To the Luke employees who have supported us, thank you. Thank you for seeing the value in our work. We want you to know your dollars made a difference in our region for so many. More importantly, it is our hope that the programs you have helped support will be there to support you when the need arises.

For more information, visit cuw.org or dial 2-1-1 for program and service needs.

Juli McCoy

Rabies Vaccination Clinics Scheduled Throughout Garrett County

The Garrett County Health Department’s Environmental Health office has announced this spring’s low-cost rabies clinics for the vaccination of dogs, cats, and ferrets at six locations. No other animals will be vaccinated. The Garrett County Health Department will NOT be holding June low-cost rabies clinics this year.

“Garrett County has experienced one case of rabies so far this year, and three last year,” said Bryce Manges, environmental health specialist. “Protect your pets and your family from the threat of this virus by bringing your dogs, cats, and ferrets to the clinic in your area.”

The schedule is as follows:

  • Grantsville Elementary School, Monday, May 13, 5-6 p.m.
  • Gorman Fire Department, Tuesday, May 14, 5-6 p.m.
  • Friendsville Elementary School, Wednesday, May 15, 5-6 p.m.
  • Accident Elementary School, Thursday, May 16, 5-6 p.m.
  • Bloomington Fire Department, Friday, May 17, 5-6 p.m.
  • Oakland, Garrett County Health Department, Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m. – Noon

The cost of the vaccination is $5 per animal at the clinics. Dogs must be on a leash and under the control of a responsible individual. Cats and ferrets must be brought to the clinic in a cage or a tightly secured box with air holes. If a cage or carrier is not available, the cat must be carried in a pillowcase or suitable cloth sack. Close contact of animals at the clinics increases the risk of bites or scratches. Please be prepared to restrain and control your animals to avoid a potential incident.

The Centers for Control of Disease and Prevention (CDC) describes rabies as a preventable viral disease of mammals that is transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and leading to death. Rabies in both humans and pets is preventable by following proper procedures and guidelines.

“Garrett County is very fortunate to have many forms of wildlife,” said Bob Stephens, Garrett County Health Officer, “but, wild mammals – bats, foxes, squirrels, coyotes, skunks, and raccoons are the main carriers of rabies. Parents should teach their kids not to play with or touch wild animals and even unfamiliar cats and dogs. While these animals may look friendly, they could also carry the rabies virus, which untreated could be fatal. People bitten by these animals should seek prompt medical care. Also, please report stray dogs and cats to Garrett County animal control.”

Many species of animals are more active this time of year, increasing the likelihood of crossing paths with people – especially children. Raccoons are the most frequently identified carrier of rabies in Maryland, and since they normally are active only at night, any raccoon seen wandering around in the daytime is highly suspicious for rabies.

Cats with rabies serve as a reminder that the disease is not associated only with wild animals. Rabid cats are a special concern. Last year, cats were the third most common species that tested positive for rabies in Maryland. And, cats are the number one domestic animal species most likely to be unvaccinated and have frequent contact with humans.

“Feral and stray cats tend to be common in the agricultural community in Garrett County,” Manges added. “Farm owners need to be vigilant of feral or unfamiliar cats residing in and around buildings. Attempts should be made to control these feral cat populations by having them removed or vaccinated against rabies.”

“To protect your pets and family, keep pets’ rabies vaccinations up-to-date,” said Manges. “Although Maryland law requires dogs, cats, and ferrets over four months of age to be vaccinated against rabies, they may be adequately vaccinated at three months of age. Dogs and cats need to be revaccinated every three years. Puppies and kittens vaccinated between the ages of three and twelve months, and dogs and cats receiving their first vaccination must be revaccinated 12 months later. Ferrets need to be revaccinated every year.”

County dog and cat licenses will be available at each clinic. License cost is $3 per year for a spayed/neutered animal and $15 for non-spayed/neutered.

“The vaccination of dogs and cats is one of the most critical measures which can be taken by pet owners in protecting their families and themselves from possible exposure to the rabies virus,” Manges said. “Since wildlife rabies continues to be in Garrett County, all pet owners are strongly urged to bring their pets to one of the clinics.”

For more information about rabies or these clinics, call Environmental Health at 301-334-7760.